Complimentary Colours at the Tate Modern

Complimentary Colours at the Tate Modern

When light falls upon another color, then, as a result of this new combination, it takes on another nuance of color. – Aristotle

Today we went to the Tate Modern, so I thought it would be the perfect day to wear a bold combination of complimentary colors to see their effect on each other and to create an eye catching look.

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Complimentary colors are those colors which when combined in the right proportions, produce white or black. Sir Isaac Newton devised a circle showing a spectrum of seven colors- certain colors around the circle were opposed to each other and provided the greatest contrast: red-green, yellow-violet, blue-orange.

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Color makes its impact from contrasts rather than from its inherent qualities….the primary colors seem more brilliant when they are in contrast with their complementary colors. – Monet 1988

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In 1872, Claude Monet painted Impression, Sunrise, a tiny orange sun and some orange light reflected on the clouds and water in the center of a hazy blue landscape. This painting, with its striking use of the complementary colors orange and blue, gave its name to the impressionist movement.

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Orange and blue became an important combination for all the impressionist painters. They knew that orange placed next to blue made both colors much brighter. Auguste Renoir painted boats with stripes of chrome orange paint straight from the tube. Paul Cézanne used orange made of touches of yellow, red and ochre against a blue background.

WEARING

UNITED COLORS OF BENETTON TOP

AL CAMPO LEATHER JACQUET

PRIMARK FLORAL WEDGE SHOES

PRIMARK JEANS

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Vincent van Gogh wrote of searching for broken colors and neutral colors to harmonize the brutality of extremes, trying to make the colors intense, and not a harmony of greys. He created his own oranges with mixtures of yellow, ochre and red, and placed them next to slashes of sienna red and bottle green, and below a sky of turbulent blue and violet. He put an orange moon and stars in a cobalt blue sky.

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Here I have combined my old school *slightly dirty :/ dunlop trainers with a maroon shirt for a more casual contrasting look

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Describing his painting, The Night Café, to his brother Theo in 1888, Van Gogh wrote: “I sought to express with red and green the terrible human passions. The hall is blood red and pale yellow, with a green billiard table in the center, and four lamps of lemon yellow, with rays of orange and green. Everywhere it is a battle and antithesis of the most different reds and greens.”

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Saint Thomas Aquinas wrote that purple looked different next to white than it did next to black, and that gold looked more striking against blue than it did against white

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After visiting the Matisse exhibition we went up to the members room for some coffee and cake and some great views over London! Art is my inspiration, what is yours?

WEARING

UNITED COLORS OF BENETTON TOP

NEXT SHIRT

DUNLOP TRAINERS

PRIMARK JEANS

CHANNEL BOTTLE I-PHONE CASE

When in Rome…

When in Rome…

 Strange as it may seem now, a few years ago, after having flown around the world all my life, I developed a massive fear of flying. I don’t know if any of you reading this have ever felt such irrational fears? It got to the point where I would embark and with every turn, bump or even sound I thought the plane was going down. Anyone who got up to the toilet I would scrutinize as I thought they were a terrorist. If someone had said put a gun to your head and play Russian roulette or board and fly on a plane, I would have felt safer to pull the trigger. Enclosed, trapped, no way out, no control. Horrible. So, I made a stand and said no more flying. For the next THREE years I traveled everywhere by coach, train or car. My family would set off and I would join them, sometimes thousands of miles away a few days later.

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For those who haven’t experienced them, coach journeys are long, smelly and worst of all you meet and can’t escape from weirdos. This wasn’t quite life in the fast lane.  So, I decided it was time, time to fight to the fear. After 3 years of remaining Earth bound, I booked two flights to somewhere not too far, but somewhere where I had always wanted to go – Rome. It took a lot for me to make that first journey, but facing my fears is what I had to do. The city was so wonderful, the sites so interesting. It was then that I vowed never to let fear hamper my life again.

I would greatly recommend going inside the Colosseum and and buying the Colosseum Tour. We did ours through SP.Q.R tours, which gave us a free tour of the Palatine Hill and the Forum Panorama. Really I felt that this day was the highlight of our trip. Just a short walk away, up a large boulevard is the majestic Victor Emmanuel monument. In the evening I would recommend Plaza di Fiori, where we had wine and listened to beautiful music. Another must see is the Pantheon, an architectural marvel, which is close to the Fontana di Trevi and Piazza Navona where I had the best Capuccino ever! Just walking round the little streets and finding a pretty cafe is really romantic in this city. We had a week, so we also went to see the Circus Maximus and the abandoned Roman Baths, which are further out. The weather that day was stormy, so we got some great atmospheric shots. It was incredible how the murals were just left to the rain and it was even possible to walk on them. This city just has so much culture and history. In most cities this would be the main attraction! Plaza del Popolo was lively and this was the best place for shopping! Villa Burghesa offered great views over the city. I would recommend hiring an electric tuk tuk to pedal round the grounds.

Finally, the Vatican, a whole country in itself, with nuns and gigantic religious statues galor. Vatican City, one of the most sacred places in Christendom, attests to a great history and a formidable spiritual venture. A unique collection of artistic and architectural masterpieces lie within the boundaries of this small state. At its centre is St Peter’s Basilica, with its double colonnade and a circular piazza in front and bordered by palaces and gardens. The basilica, erected over the tomb of St Peter the Apostle, is the largest religious building in the world, the fruit of the combined genius of Bramante, Raphael, Michelangelo, Bernini and Maderno. We did the tour, but apart from enabling us to jump the queue (which was massive), I wouldn’t really recommend it. A great way to bypass this is to read to Angels and Demons by Dan Brown (one of my favorite books) and look out for all the places referred to and discussed in that. When you go to the Vatican don’t forget to bring some food and water with you, as your day will be long and there are no places to buy anything once inside. Don’t forget to see Castle Sant’ Angelo on your way back to the city.

St Patrick’s Day in Dublin

St Patrick’s Day in Dublin

Hey everyone! So My Girls on Tour decided to venture over to Ireland to celebrate St Patrick’s Day. The Irish are renowned for their hard partying and amazing spirit – so the perfect place really to celebrate a festival which has come to be associated with crazy fancy dress costumes and Guinness Drinking.

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At Carolls buying some memorabilia for the big day!

Woohoo! Dublin, my first time to Ireland! So pumped Yay Yay YAY! Announcement* – Ryanair flight to delayed :/ Fail, EPIC FAIL! Deep breath, I won’t let Ryanair ruin my Irish experience. I changed my I-phone track to the Cranberries (Zombie of course!) and strode over resolutely to the free Whiskey sample stand. St Patrick’s day, WOOHOO! OK, so now that I actually find myself in front of the stand, the proper real festive, celebratory thing to do would be to shot some down. Really though, it is 10 am? One shot, just for the sake of doing it? So yes, another fail. I took a sneaky pic, gazed gleefully at the green, orange and white balloons and then snuck off to Costa Coffee. I felt like the Grinch of Paddy’s.

Arriving at the city center, the Grinch’s heart started to melt. Groups of festive tourists in large green hats, shops with fun costumes, beads, wands, glasses, face paints. Temple bar was full with revelers. Although very kitsch, large murals of leprechauns and even a leprechaun museum. All the buildings were lit up in Green.We walked around and saw some real old pubs and the fun went on long into the night. As Sir Toby Belch says in Twelfth Night, ‘not to be a-bed after midnight is to be up betimes’.

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Today is the day, the parade. We lined up all dressed up. A sea of green. The sky was grey, ominous, the flashes of colors, children’s balloons, a stark contrast. It was the music that we heard first, light and airy, almost celestial. The rain had started a few minutes earlier. When the sound reached our ears, a cheer rippled through the crowd. A huge roar and a first pump came from the young guy next to me who had been standing in just a t-shirt. Then came the procession, rolling slowly towards us. Dancers, clowns, traditional costumes, huge sculptures, acrobats and carousels, all performing and entertaining.  The revelry made the Gods smile and the sky got lighter and the sun came out.

The theme of the parade was Science. Dinosaurs in wheel chairs, eyes and plants. A festival of science and religion.

Indeed St Patrick’s day is a cultural and religious holiday celebrating the arrival of Christianity in Ireland and the most commonly-recognized patron saint of Ireland, Saint Patrick. On this day, the day of  St Patrick’s death, it is customary to wear shamrocks and green clothing or accessories.St Patrick is said to have used the shamrock, a three-leaved plant, to explain the Holy Trinity to the pagan Irish.

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